Friday, 19 February 2016

Solid Advice When Training Your Dog

You might be tempted to think of dog training as merely a necessary step between acquiring your dog and enjoying your pet's company. This would be a mistake, though. If you take the time to educate yourself on the process, you can make dog training just as enjoyable and rewarding as the dog-owning years that follow it. Read on to pick up some helpful tips to improve your dog-training skills.

If you don't have the time, money or inclination to take your naughty dog to a professional trainer, you can obedience train your pooch at home to turn him into a well-behaved family member by following a few simple tips. Within a matter of weeks, your dog should be able to "sit," "stay," and "come" on demand. Some dogs learn at faster rates than others, but prepare yourself to be patient. Use positive reinforcement in the form of praise and treats to reward your dog each time he listens. If he makes a mistake, correct him in a firm voice without yelling. Limit your training to a few short sessions per day, approximately 10 minutes each. Make sure you are in a quiet room or yard with no distractions. Be consistent with your hand signals and verbal instructions. Once your dog has mastered these simple commands, it's time to train him how to fetch your slippers and bring you breakfast in bed!

If your dog is misbehaving, try to determine why. It is important to work out why your dog is doing what it does. Knowing the reason for poor behavior can make training significantly easier. It is far more difficult to correct an action that you do not fully understand the reasoning behind.

A dog's name should only be used when positively interacting with the animal. Call the dog's name to get him to come to your side or call his name when you are serving his dinner. Don't, however, call your dog's name when you are unhappy with his or her actions. The dog would negatively associate that with punishment.

Do not tie a couple of dogs closely together. If chains get intertwined, the dogs can get hurt. If one dog is larger than the other, it could accidentally tangle the cord around the smaller dog's neck, causing it to become unable to breath, and possibly die.

Make your dog training fun for both you and your animal. If you are not having fun then more than likely, your dog is not either. This can lead to you both having a bad experience. The more fun you can make your dog training the faster it will go for both of you. Try to look at dog training as a game, and not as a chore.

One of the first things most people teach their dogs is the sit command. This is very basic but is handy for your dog to know, especially when you want to get his attention. One way to teach your dog to sit is to take a piece of dog treat and hold it about six inches from his nose. Slowly raise the treat straight up and say "Fido, sit". You may have to use your hand to help him into the position until he realizes what you want.

You should always call your dog in the same way. Always start your commands with his name. Give a simple command after beginning with the dog's name. This will get their attention quick and aid your training routine.

Use your dog's name when you can, as it will help to get your dog to pay attention. Use it as often as possible when you have your puppy during the first weeks, the puppy will make the connection. Choose a shorter name that can stand out from other terms.

Dog training is an activity that needs to be done frequently. When trying to teach a dog a new behavior one needs to be repetitive. By frequently demonstrating the proper activity or saying the command word it will help the dog learn it. The repetition will facilitate learning of new behaviors for the dog.

If you want your dog to stop digging, play with him in the yard. Many dogs who dig do so out of boredom and the desire to get back at their owner. Playing in the yard with your pet offers him the socialization and exercise he needs, and it is also a fun way to bond with your favorite pooch.

Food is one of the best positive reinforcement tools available to the owner in the dog training process. Feeding a dog after it has behaved acceptably is a powerful message that any dog will understand. Of course, dogs should not be starved! But associating feeding time with success will encourage a dog to work harder to live up to its owner's expectations.

Training sessions should be kept short. Fifteen minutes is about the right time to work on a training task, spending much more time than this will frustrate your dog and set back progress. After training, praise the dog for a job well done.

Your dog will benefit from having a strong leader. Be confident in your ability to communicate with your dog! You two may speak different languages, but your physical gestures have more meaning than you think. Stand straight during training sessions and always make physical gestures clearly. Your dog will thank you for your clarity with great behavior!

Your dog will benefit from consistency. Make sure that everybody in your house knows the same commands you have taught your dog. All physical commands should be given the same way among family members. In other words, your "sit" command should look the same whether your sister or your mother asks your dog to do it!

These tips are just a few of the ways you can make dog training more enjoyable and fulfilling for you and your pooch. You should not consider the training process as a separate phase from your overall dog-owning experience; when you do it well, training can be just as rewarding as any other time spent with your dog.